Tuesday, 19 May 2015

Colour In May

Back in 2013, I followed Geoff Hamilton's advice and visited a garden centre or nursery each month of the year and bought a plant which was flowering so that I'd have something blooming in my garden every month of the year.

I chose aquilegia vulgaris Clementine Purple in May 2013 and it's blooming again at the moment.


It's a much smaller plant than the other aquilegias I grow in my garden and although it's put on some growth in the two years I've had it, it's still rather small. I wondered if this plant would self seed as prolifically as other aquilegias do, but I haven't had any seedlings from it as yet. It's quite a showy aquilegia having fluffy, double flowers.


Most of my other aquilegias are the run of the mill ones which have self seeded, their heads face downwards so it's nice to have one which looks up at me, something a little different.

38 comments:

  1. you could collect seed from it although it may cross pollinate with the others you have in the garden so may not come true :-)

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    1. I often have the best intentions where seed saving is concerned and then forget all about it as the season progresses. Who knows, perhaps I'll give it a go with this plant, it would be interesting to see what grows.

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  2. That is such a great piece of advice by Geoff Hamilton!

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    1. It is. I think a few people are following my lead this year, there's lots of monthly plant purchasing happening.

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  3. hi jo,
    this aquilegias looks very beautiful. love the colour!
    have a nice day,
    regina

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    1. It's a pretty plant, a lot more compact than other aquilegias I've got and it's a fabulous colour.

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  4. They are stunning, I have become a fan of Aquilegias, I have 4 different colours so far, but I can see more coming if I can find room.

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    1. I love aquilegias too. I'd like a yellow one, I've got yellow and red but I've fallen in love with the pure yellow ones.

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  5. It's a gorgeous colour, let's hope it continues to grow.

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    1. I hope it does, though I doubt it will ever get as big as some of my other aquilegies, some of those are very well established. I think this is a much smaller variety.

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  6. It's pretty - I wonder if it being a double makes it set less seed? I don't really know, just a random thought!

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    1. I wonder if it does, I've never considered that. Definitely something to look in to.

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  7. A good colour. Worth saving some seed if you can. Flighty xx

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    1. I think I might have a go at saving seed from it this year, it's a lovely plant, I'd like to have a few more of them.

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  8. My Aquliegias have evidently been "at it" again, because I have some different colours this year, including one which is very pale, almost white.

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    1. You're lucky to get self seeded aquilegias in a range of colours, I've never had any other than pink or purple.

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  9. Hello - blog hopping this morning! I have lots of Aquilegias in various colours and had a Nora Barlow tousle-headed one like this but think it may have succombed over the winter. I got some unusual ones from Touchwood Nurseries near Swansea, but she has Downey Mildew so won't be selling any this year. Worth checking out her website for inspiration.

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    1. What a shame about your Nora Barlow, that's a pretty aquilegia, such a lovely colour. I do love aquilegias so I shall definitely check out the website you mention.

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  10. Hi JO,
    Stunning plant, beautiful deep colour.
    Sometimes doubles do not produce seed.
    I am wondering ??

    Leave you to research that :)

    Aquilegia are one of my favourite cottage garden plants.

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    1. It's a proper dark purple, really lovely. I've had a quick look around on the internet and it's mentioned that this variety does self seed so it must produce seed. I may have a go at collecting some this year.

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  11. I have one similar to this but a single flower. It just appeared as I never planted it. A lovely colour

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    1. I usually prefer single flowers but I saw this and thought it quite unusual, I liked it. You're lucky to have such pretty flowers just appear, the aquilegias which self seed in my garden are all much of a muchness.

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  12. It is lovely Jo, I spotted a purple aquilegia in my garden last week. Not quite as pretty as your one but it is a lovely shade. I'm hoping to get a couple of seeds from it x

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    1. I have lots of self sown purple ones in the garden but they're not as fancy as this one. I still like them though so I allow them to stay.

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  13. What a gorgeous colour! I have some aquilegias as well - just the common type, I believe. Although they do come back every year, they do not seem to be spreading/self seeding, which is too bad as I do quite enjoy them.

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    1. They're lovely flowers, even the common types are very attractive. They're one flower I don't mind self seeding around the garden, they do pop up everywhere, I just wish some new colours would break through.

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  14. That is gorgeous Jo, as you say it's nice to see one with it's head up, mine are all self seeded too, with droopy heads, they are very hardy though and seem to survive anything that the weather throws at them!xxx

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    1. I've got lots of that type in the garden too. I do love aquilegias so it's hard to uproot the seedlings so I allow them to stay.

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  15. Replies
    1. It's a beauty. A real dark purple, I love it.

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  16. That 's a good advice to follow for continuous bloom! I have quite a few different aquilegias even though I only ever planted one variety - they must have selfseeded from neighbouring gardens. The color of the flower is always a lovely surprise.

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    1. I've planted three in the garden myself, this one, a McKenna Hybrid which I grew from seed, that's red and yellow and another more common purple one but all my self seeders are either purple or pink.

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  17. I've heard that advice before and it's very sound. That is a lovely aquilegia. We have none flowering yet.

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    1. All my aquilegias, except the red and yellow one, are flowering away, they're such lovely flowers.

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  18. I love the colour of this aquilegia ... a splash of purple is always nice to see.

    All the best Jan

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    1. It's a lovely colour. There's quite a few purples about at the moment but this one is a dark shade, just lovely.

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  19. I do love my aquilegias but I have to admit they get a little out of hand with their self seeding ability....might be nice to have one that isn't so prolific at self seeding although with it being double headed not sure the bees would be so happy with it!!

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    1. They're very prolific plants, I've got lots of self seeded ones in the garden. I plant lots of flowers with wildlife in mind but sometimes I just see something I like which isn't so bee friendly so I buy that for me rather than them.

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